From The Alpha and the Omega - Chapter Five
by Jim A. Cornwell, Copyright © 1995, all rights reserved
" The Fall of the First Empire "

The Fall of the First Empire
-- "Biblical Archaeological Review"
Jan./Feb. 1994 page 22.

   The Akkadian Empire, led by Sargon of Akkad, flourished along the Euphrates River in Mesopotamia from 2300-2200 B.C. Scholars have recently proposed that the Akkadians around 2200 B.C. because of an abrupt climatic change--a drought--caused massive migrations to the south and the fall of the empire. Working at Tell Leilan, Harvey Weiss of Yale University and his colleagues found evidence that the local climate became much drier (perhaps because of a volcano or a massive warming of ocean currents) and remained this way for 300 years. This is still not conclusive with soil samples analyzed from other sites.
    Remember that Akkad (Heb. akkadh, Gen 10:10), was a city or district of Nimrodís kingdom, with Babel, Erech, and Calneh. Akkadís location was uncertain, though it is thought to be identified with Agade, the chief city of a district of the same name in northern Babylonia, which Sargon I, the Semitic conqueror of the Sumerian Akkadians, made his capital in c. 2350 B.C. A Bronzed head statue of an Akkadian ruler from Ninevah c. 2500 B.C. is thought to represent Niram-Sin of Agade.

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Akkadian cylinder seal
Akkadian cylinder seal
Akkadian cylinder seal
Akkadian cylinder seal
Akkadian cylinder seal

   A detail of a limestone plaque from Tello (c. 2550 B.C.) -- bas relief of basket, perhaps containing the first brick for the foundation of a temple, borne by King Ur-nanshe of Lagash.

   In another limestone relief from Tello of Ur-nanshe, king of Lagash, is shown seated on a throne with a goblet in his hand and being served by a cupbearer who stands behind him.

   Nanshe are Mesopotamian goddess of springs and waterways. Daughter of Ea (god of waters) and mother was Ninka or Damkina. Her brother was Marduk. Naiad or the plural naiades or naiads in Greek Mythology were the nymphs (of river and springs) who lived in and presided over brooks, springs, and fountains. The aquatic nymph of certain insects, such as the mayfly, damselfly, or dragonfly [Middle English, from Latin naias, naiad-, from Greek naias, probably from naein, to flow].

Akkadian cylinder seal
Akkadian cylinder seal

Image of the earliest Horse

Image of UrNammu's Stele

The Ram in the Thicket
The Ram in the Thicket

   Note that in Acts 19:24-35 specifically verse 24-26 "..silver shrines for Diana.." refers to charms carried to oneís houses. (The models of the chapel of our Lady of Loretto, and such like, which the Church of Rome systematically encourages, imitate this heathen practice, as Christianity paganized).


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